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Farmers’ views on Landscape Recovery Pilot Scheme sought by researchers

Posted 18 November

“It’s key that we hear from English farmers on their views on the pilot – and we are particularly keen to hear from those who chose not to take part in the scheme. We are looking into the issue for the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board – or AHDB - and gaining an insight into how farmers in England are adapting their farming businesses to changes in agricultural and environmental policies like these will be invaluable."

A farmer uses a tablet device in a field of oilseed rape

The views of English farmers who have chosen not to take part in the Government’s Landscape Recovery Pilot Scheme are being sought by Harper Adams University researchers.

The scheme forms part of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs’ Environmental Land Management Scheme, alongside the Sustainable Farming Incentive (SFI) and Local Nature Recovery.

The first round of projects focused on recovering and restoring England’s threatened native species – and restoring England’s streams and rivers through improving water quality, biodiversity and adapting to climate change.

In total, 22 successful bids for pilot projects were announced this September.

However, the Harper Adams research team are keen to hear from those who chose not to take part, with their study aiming to help policy makers understand why English farmers made this choice – and how policies such as the Landscape Recovery Pilot Scheme are affecting them.

Senior Lecturer Nigel Hill – one of those working on the research for Harper Adams – explained: “It’s key that we hear from English farmers on their views on the pilot – and we are particularly keen to hear from those who chose not to take part in the scheme.

“We are looking into the issue for the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board – or AHDB - and gaining an insight into how farmers in England are adapting their farming businesses to changes in agricultural and environmental policies like these will be invaluable.

“When policy changes happen, it is important to make sure their impact on businesses is fully understood - and we will, therefore, be sharing our results with DEFRA once our research is completed.

“The survey is both voluntary and anonymous - no individuals or farm holdings will be identified in any form in the final report.”

 Completing the survey should take around 15-20 minutes and can be done online.

The survey can be found here.

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